Honey Chocolate Chip Cookies and Tips for using Honey

honey chip cookies


perfect snack

I love baking with honey. Different flavor. Different texture. Always a good adventure.

start with honey and butter

lovely creamy batter


Years ago I sent for a small cookbook called “Cookin’ with Honey” and put out by the Minnesota BeeKeepers Association. They packed 190 recipes into this little book and lots of great tips. Although the recipe I used is straight out of this cookbook, the advice on making substitutions is a great tip to bookmark. Here’s their rule:

add chips and walnuts


Tips for swapping out honey instead of sugar:
• In a cake or cookie recipe that calls for other sweetening, the general rule is to substitute 2/3 cup honey for each cup of sugar in the recipe.
• Also reduce the amount of liquid by ¼ cup for each cup of honey used.
• When substituting honey in baked goods, add ½ tsp baking soda to the recipe for every cup of honey used.
• Bake it about 25 degrees lower than called for to prevent over-browning.

adorn with an extra chip or two


This is a small batch – about 2 dozen cookies. If you’re not sure about baking with honey, this is a good one to cut your teeth on. The cookies are softer than cookies made with sugar and a bit more cakelike. And the flavor is subtle, but definitely honey.

dark chips really work well


Ingredients for Cookies
½ cup honey
½ cup butter
1 egg
1 tsp vanilla
1 ½ cups flour
½ tsp soda
¼ tsp baking powder
½ tsp salt
½ cup walnuts – I roast mine in the oven first for 8 minutes to bring out the snap of the nuts.
1 cup chocolate chips – I used Ghiradelli Dark

Directions
Preheat oven to 350 degrees
Cream the honey and butter and add the egg and vanilla.
Sift dry ingredients together and add to the honey mixture.
Mix just until blended and then add the nuts and chips and stir to blend.
Drop by teaspoonfuls.
Bake for 10 -12 minutes.

Dark Ghiradelli chocolate chips, snappy walnuts and honey make this a wonderful cookie to enjoy.

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27 thoughts on “Honey Chocolate Chip Cookies and Tips for using Honey

  1. have been making these cookies for about 2 months now and love them. My Naturopath had told me to try Spelt flour instead of white flour (I was previously using 1 cup white and 1/2 whole wheat flour and they were perfect texture and taste. Using the spelt flour she told me to reduce it by 1 tbsp. They are really tasty still but they dry out really fast. What else can I add to ensure they stay moist like the regular recipe?

    • Amber, try adding an additional egg to keep them moist. And be sure to store them in an airtight container when baked. You might try just baking a few at a time and keeping the dough in little balls in the freezer so you can bake a few at a time. Thanks for the note. Clare

  2. Just saw Dr. Oz with cookies made from honey instead of sugar…which led me here. So happy to find your site! Wrote down the recipe and will try this evening…have been craving cookies!!! Mmmmmmm thank you!

  3. Hi I made these cookies yesterday and they were amazing! thank you for sharing :) I was just wondering if I could use quaker oats next time instead of flour to make oatmeal chocolate chip cookies? would It work or do I have to use the flour everytime

    • Hi Tianda. I’m so happy you liked the cookies. Here is a great oatmeal choc chip cookie recipe that I shared some time ago. No flour needed, so I make it for those who need gluten free.
      And yes, I think you could easily experiment with the honey cookie recipe to eliminate the flour and swap out oats. I usually put in about 1 1/2 cups of oats for every cup of recommended flour, but this is just an estimate. Let me know how they turn out. Peace, Clare

  4. Hi, I am looking forward to trying out this recipe for my kids school lunches. We are in a nut free class and I am wondering if I can drop the walnuts without adding anything in to replace them? Thanks.

  5. Thank you so much for sharing this recipe – these cookies are absolutely amazing! Probably my favorite that I have ever baked :-) a big hit with family and friends!

  6. I made the honey choc-chip cookies today. I bought a jar of raw local honey and realized I did not like the taste didn’t want it to go to waste, found your recipe and made them to see. They are delicious, My son really likes them also! Thanks!!

  7. I just made these cookies and due to the fact I have several food sensitivities, I made them gluten-free, soy-free, and almost dairy-free (unless you are extremely sensitive to lactose, butter usually doesn’t affect most lactose intolerant people). I’m sure margarine, coconut oil, or other butter replacements could be used.

    I made the following simple substitutions:

    Substituted the flour with 1 3/4 cups Mama’s Almond Blend All Purpose Flour gluten free flour substitute.

    Substituted chocolate chips with Enjoy Life gluten-free, dairy-free, soy-free and nut-free chocolate mini-chips. (I used 1/4 cup so I could use more nuts).

    I also used 1 cup of coarsely chopped walnuts.

    Added 1/4 tsp. of xanthan gum to keep the soft texture from falling apart.

    Hint: Non-glutenous flour sometimes doesn’t brown like regular flour. I baked these for exactly 9 minutes and they turned out very light brown, almost didn’t change color, so take care not to over bake.

  8. Pingback: Peanut butter & cocoa nib cookies | Sharky Oven Gloves

  9. Thanks! I’m going to try this, but with raisins or something else in place of the chocolate chips since they contain sugar.

    Due to food intolerance issues, I don’t consume cane or beet sugar (in any form) so am eager to learn how to bake using honey (or maple syrup or date syrup). In my research it says when using honey to reduce the amount of the liquid. However… most cookie and cake recipes do NOT have ‘liquid’ in the first place. So I’m stumped. Do you have any information on how to adapt cookie and cake recipes (using honey in place of sugar) that don’t have liquid to replace?

    Thanks for your help!

    • Hi DesertRose, thanksf for your comments. You are right that most cookie recipes don’t contain much liquid. However, we count the oil and eggs as part of the “liquid” in a recipe. You might use a smaller egg and reduce your butter or oil by just a bit. Cooking with honey will yield a softer product, so a bit less oil shouldn’t hurt.
      Cakes however usually do call for milk or buttermilk, so you should be OK there.
      May I suggest that you look for a beekeepers association and see if they have more help for you online. My tips came from a booklet I got ove 30 yrs ago from the Minnesota Beekeepers Association.
      Good luck with your experiments and happy baking!

  10. I just love your blog – it’s so bright and chreey – it makes me happy every time I visit! I just left you a Butterfly Award on my site – come on over and check it out.Lyla

  11. These were great! Thank you for posting this. Many nutritionists argue that honey is a healthier alternative to processed white sugar. It also seems to have its benefits politically, as well. Great recipe!

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